Hi! My name is Cédric Bozzi, I make websites and iOS apps, and this is my blog about technology (mostly a Twitter archive, really).

24 February 2011

“Apple - Mac OS X Lion Preview”

Auto Save in Mac OS X Lion automatically saves your work — while you work — so you don’t have to. Lion saves changes in the working document instead of creating additional copies, making the best use of available disk space. The lock feature prevents inadvertent changes from being saved and automatically locks documents after two weeks.

That sounds awfully complicated. In my opinion, the fact that you need a lock mechanism — how counter-intuitive is that? — proves that system-wide auto-save is a bad idea. And the idea that the behavior completely changes when the files becomes to two-week old, or something (it’s not entirely clear)? That’s insane.

I just hope you can disable that stuff in the System Preferences.

Mac OS X Lion automatically creates a version of the document each time you open it and every hour while you’re working on it.

That’s nice, though. The “in an interface similar to that of Time Machine” scares me, though — I hope it’s integrated better than having Versions and Time Machine simply coexist (and Versions alone could no replace Time Machine, because it wouldn’t handle all the cases that the older system does).

Resume lets you restart your Mac — after a software update, for example — and return to what you were doing.

A fancy way of saying that Safari will now remember your open tabs when you restart it. Some would say it’s about time.

Just like Mail on iPad, Mail 5 in Mac OS X Lion features a new layout that takes advantage of the widescreen display on your Mac.

I’m not convinced at all; I like my desktop app to have the folder hierarchy visible at all times. The iPad view makes sense on iPad because it has a 1024x768 screen; if you’re gonna say the new Mail app is widescreen, then why doesn’t it have three columns? Computer users can handle three columns. Seriously.

With AirDrop in Mac OS X Lion, you can send files to anyone around you — wirelessly. AirDrop doesn’t require setup or special settings. Just click the AirDrop icon in the Finder sidebar, and your Mac automatically discovers other people nearby who are using AirDrop.

That’s cool.

Lion Server is now part of Mac OS X Lion.

And I guess that’s reassuring. (They’re not completely abandoning Server. Yet.)

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